07:58:36 | 2012-11-05

  • 1.
    Future Is in Limbo for the Damaged Buildings Close to the Water’s Edge
  • 2.
    Smooth Moves for Tenants in a Storm
  • 3.
    New York Braces for Chaotic Commute Monday Morning Following Hurricane
  • 4.
    High Drama With Crane Comes to an End
  • 5.
    About That Gold Stored in Flood-Prone Lower Manhattan
  • 6.
    Sandy's impact
  • 7.
    Man with bionic leg to climb Chicago skyscraper
  • 8.
    The office space scramble
  • 9.
    NY Chinatown recovering from storm
  • 10.
    21 Images That Show Why The NYC Marathon Was Canceled
Good Morning New York! Here’s Some Real Estate News to Get You Started:
Future Is in Limbo for the Damaged Buildings Close to the Water’s Edge

Many of the soaked towers that poke into the downtown Manhattan sky have dried out. Their lights blink. Their elevators run. The heat is on. But a far starker and more problematic future persists for scores of commercial and residential buildings that hover near the water’s edge, especially those that dot the financial district. Their mechanical and electrical systems destroyed by millions of gallons of water from swollen rivers, they remain weeks or months away from being able to reopen and invite their tenants back.

[NYT]

Smooth Moves for Tenants in a Storm

Like millions of workers in the New York City region last week, many office space brokers were unable to make it to work last week because of the havoc Sandy created. But few took the week off. Rather, most of them were calling up office tenants that they’ve worked with over the years helping them deal with power losses, flooding and the need for temporary offices.

[WSJ]

New York Braces for Chaotic Commute Monday Morning Following Hurricane

New Yorkers are heading back to work Monday morning — but officials warned not to expect an easy commute. The MTA is bracing for huge crowds on a subway system that is still limping toward recovery following Hurricane Sandy, with several train lines down and all others running fewer trains than usual.

[DNAinfo]

High Drama With Crane Comes to an End

In a delicate, two-day operation, construction workers high above Midtown Manhattan tethered and braced the swaying boom of a crane that was crippled during Sandy, clearing the way for the reopening of the normally bustling area streets that had been evacuated for a week. By late afternoon Sunday, some of the streets and buildings around the West 57th Street construction site had been opened. Others were due to open later, with work scheduled to be completed overnight Sunday.

[WSJ]

About That Gold Stored in Flood-Prone Lower Manhattan

As New York City continues to dry out in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, the financial world is reconsidering just how smart it is to place critical pieces of infrastructure in flood-prone areas. Citigroup’s (C) waterlogged building at 111 Wall St. will be unusable for several weeks, and two critical Verizon Communications (VZ) facilities suffered extensive flooding during the storm.

[Business Week]

Sandy’s impact

After 9/11, the Partnership for New York City, a business group made up of the city’s largest private-sector employers, commissioned seven consulting firms to calculate the disaster’s economic impact. Altogether, the loss of life, property, economic activity and revenue, as well as the public cost to the government for cleanup, tallied $83 billion, according to the Partnership’s study.

[Crains New York]

Man with bionic leg to climb Chicago skyscraper

Zac Vawter considers himself a test pilot. After losing his right leg in a motorcycle accident, the 31-year-old software engineer signed up to become a research subject, helping to test a trailblazing prosthetic leg that’s controlled by his thoughts.

[NY Daily News]

The office space scramble

Many of the city’s office tenants—outfits from big to small, high tech to no tech—found themselves in the same uncomfortable boat last week, facing the sudden need to re-house their businesses in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. With buildings south of midtown powerless for days, and many in flooded downtown possibly out of commission for weeks, the race was on for temporary quarters. Some have moved in with clients or customers; others are out looking to lock up acres of space for weeks or even months.

[Crains New York]

NY Chinatown recovering from storm

New York City’s Chinatown struggled over the weekend to replace possessions and restore peace of mind in the wake of superstorm Sandy, as merchants and residents took comfort in the return of basic services but also assessed their losses.

[China Daily]

21 Images That Show Why The NYC Marathon Was Canceled

The Bloomberg Administration has relented and postponed the marathon. The NYC Marathon starts in Staten Island just before the Verrazano Bridge. South Beach, a neighborhood nearby, suffered tremendous damage from Sandy. Here are 21 photos of what it looks like in some places there.

[Buzz Feed]

6 Pics Of A Flooded NYC Subway Station

The MTA released pictures of the Cranberry Street Tunnel, “which carries the A and C trains between Brooklyn and Manhattan underneath the East River.”

[Buzz Feed]

What New York City needs to rebuild

Add “storm surge” to the list of disasters that New York’s aging and overstrained infrastructure can’t handle. Before Sandy, New York was considered by climate scientists to be at low risk for hurricanes but highly vulnerable to them. That may explain why the city was structurally unprepared for last week’s storm. The city’s roads, tunnels, sewers and power lines will take weeks to repair and years to rehabilitate.

[Crains New York]

Up to 40,000 New Yorkers Left Homeless After Hurricane Sandy, Mayor Says

Hurricane Sandy left up to 40,000 New Yorkers homeless, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said Sunday. The storm devastated neighborhoods from Staten Island to the Rockaways, flooding thousands of homes and cutting electricity to hundreds of thousands more — and now officials are scrambling to find housing for those who were affected.

[DNAinfo]

What’s the Deal

Among the many real-estate closings held up by Sandy last week was one involving New York City’s only Boy Scout camp, which is located on Staten Island, one of the hardest hit parts of the city.

[WSJ]

Would You Buy on the Waterfront?

IF tropical storm Irene last year was an eye-opener, Hurricane Sandy was a reality check. Waterfront property in the New York area is some of the most coveted in the nation, but after back-to-back years of supposedly once-in-a-generation storms, public officials, developers, brokers and homeowners are being forced to re-evaluate.

[NYT]

Stargazing in the Elevator

CELEBRITIES who hang their hats in and around Los Angeles tend to live in private homes where, inside at least, they are safe from prying eyes and enthusiastic fans.

[NYT]

The Elegance of Restraint

MURRAY HILL is a little like the BlackBerry of New York neighborhoods. Manhattanites are relentlessly snobby about it — it doesn’t convey an attitude like the West Village or the Upper East Side — but it’s remarkably efficient. That’s what Francisco Costa, the women’s creative director of the Calvin Klein Collection, discovered when he moved there from a place on Central Park South with his partner, John DeStefano, a horse trainer, almost eight years ago.

[NYT]

Relief efforts shower down on Sandy-struck Long Island

On hurricane-swept Long Island Saturday, there were two Federal Emergency Management stations, five Red Cross food stations, dozens of recharge-your-phone stations and, at long last, stations offering the very next kind of comfort on many a Sandy-survivor’s list — free hot showers.

[USA Today]

Relief efforts shower down on Sandy-struck Long Island

On hurricane-swept Long Island Saturday, there were two Federal Emergency Management stations, five Red Cross food stations, dozens of recharge-your-phone stations and, at long last, stations offering the very next kind of comfort on many a Sandy-survivor’s list — free hot showers.

[USA Today] 

What Sandy taught us

First, life has to be rewound to Friday, Oct. 26 — the last weekday before Superstorm Sandy crippled and disoriented the New York area. To make that happen, repairs to damaged power grids, transportation networks and housing will grind on for weeks, if not months, at a staggering cost.

[Times Union]

Staten Island recovery from Hurricane Sandy will be slow, but sure

It’s going to take time, of course. No one simply rebounds from an event as overwhelmingly damaging and deadly as Hurricane Sandy. Certainly not while neighbors and friends and relatives are still picking through the debris that used to be their homes, and mourning losses far greater than even that.

[Silive]

Telling Your Story: The Secrets To Content Branding

Leading into the holidays families get together often and I recently spent time with my nieces and nephews and they begged me to tell them stories several times a day.  It got me thinking, people of all ages are naturally interested when you engage them with an entertaining story.  They listen, they remember, and they ask you to tell them more.

[Forbes]

Natural Gas: America’s Future Electric Grid?

In August 2003, cascading electric blackouts across the northeast United States left roughly 50 million people without power and cost billions of dollars in economic losses. That incident called into question the reliability of America’s electric power grid.

[Forbes]

Sandy’s Long Tail Strikes a New Blow: Homelessness

New York City’s subways have creaked back into action, power is slowly being restored to areas that lost it, and many schools are set to reopen for the first time since Sandy wreaked havoc on much of the Eastern seaboard last week. But for tens of thousands of people left homeless by the storm, life remains a continuing nightmare. And it is likely to be that way for weeks, or longer.

[Fiscal Times]

Climate Change is October Surprise After Sandy; Interview

If there’s a silver lining to superstorm Sandy and its aftermath, it’s having extreme weather back on the national agenda. “Who would’ve thought the October surprise in this election would be climate change?” said author Mark Hertsgaard, speaking by phone from his home in San Francisco. “And it’s getting resonance because this storm hit the media capital of the United States.”

[Bloomberg]

The Real Luxury: A Way Out

Late in the day on Tuesday, after the weather had revealed the worst of its enmity, residents of One Main Street, the landmark waterfront building in the Dumbo section of Brooklyn, where a penthouse is priced at $19 million, took turns guarding the door to ensure that all those who entered actually lived there.

[NYT]

No relief in sight for Hurricane Sandy’s victims

On Friday, a few New York City residents were caught on camera literally screaming at Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Senator Chuck Schumer about the continuing lack of food, water and shelter in the city. After what I saw on Saturday, I can say that these residents were more than justified in their screaming.

[The Daily Caller]

Your Monday Subway Commute: Most Lines Are Back, But They’ll Be Slow and Crowded

One of the miracles of the MTA’s restoration of the subway system is how many lines the transit agency has managed to get up in running in such a short amount of time. With the exception of the L and the G, every single line is running in some fashion. There are the standouts, like the numbered trains, all of which are back to full service, end-to-end, and then there are pieces like the A-train to the Rockaways, which will be out of commission for who knows how long due to damage to the crossing through Jamaica Bay.

[Observer]

Banks Going Low-Tech in Aftermath of Sandy

Sandy’s devastating force has led many of the banks lying in its path to resort to old-fashioned, low-tech ways of serving their customers—including stocking up on cash and recording transactions by hand with ink and paper. Six banks based in New Jersey or New York had all their branches closed this week, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. said, and seven others couldn’t be reached by regulators. Executives at nine banks interviewed by The Wall Street Journal said nearly 100 of their 300 branches in the region remained closed Friday. About 300 banks in total have headquarters in the states.

[WSJ]

Millions still without power as temperature nears freezing in Eastern US

One week after Hurricane Sandy pummeled the Eastern Seaboard of the United States with high winds and a record storm surge, nearly two million homes and businesses remain without power in New Jersey, New York and Connecticut as temperatures fall near the freezing mark.

[WSWS]

After Getting Back to Normal, Big Job Is Facing New Reality

First, life has to be rewound to Friday, Oct. 26 — the last weekday before Hurricane Sandy crippled and disoriented the New York area. To make that happen, repairs to damaged power grids,transportation networks and housing will grind on for weeks, if not months, at a staggering cost.

[NYT]

‘What can I do?’: New Yorkers seek Ways to help

Normally on a Saturday morning, Erica Siegel, a 33-year-old real estate agent, would be working or taking a run. But this weekend found her packing rolls of toilet paper, boxes of garbage bags, and canned vegetables and soups to bring to a Queens park, where they would be sorted for delivery to storm victims.

[Daily Herald]

Housing woes rise as temperatures fall after Sandy

Alina Braverman returned home Sunday to storm-battered Lower Manhattan. Not because power had been restored to the area that was flooded by the East River storm surge. But because Braverman said she had just hours to retrieve family possessions from the seven-floor building that had been declared temporarily uninhabitable pending two to four weeks of repairs.

[USA Today]

Can Landlords Charge Rent While Buildings Are Uninhabitable?

With many buildings still uninhabitable, one question on a lot of peoples’ minds is whether or not landlords will be able to demand rent payments for apartments that can’t be lived in. The short answer is: Yes,they can demand rent, although doing so could be seen as an act of war against the tenants, who are already not the happiest of campers.

[Curbed]

Getting Out of North Brooklyn Might Be a Problem

One of North Brooklynites’ favorite pastimes—complaining about the L train—is about to become a full time job. Even though service was restored to 80 percent of subway lines as of yesterday, with more expected to be up and running today, the MTA has no timeline for the L (MTA chairman Joe Lhota said he hopes it’s restored “one day next week”) or the G (flooded with Newtown Creek Superfund water, too depressing to even address.)

[Curbed]

Government seeks apartments, hotels for Sandy evacuees

U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said on Sunday federal agencies are looking for apartments and hotel rooms for people displaced by superstorm Sandy. ”Our goal is to try to get people out of the shelters,” Napolitano said at a news conference in New Jersey with Governor Chris Christie.

[Reuters]

Michelle Williams, Jason Segel’s Brooklyn Home Underwater Post Hurricane Sandy

Just like hundreds of other New York City residents, Michelle Williams and Jason Segel have been left homeless after Hurricane Sandy hit hard on Monday, Oct. 29. The couple’s apartment building in the Red Hook neighborhood of Brooklyn, N.Y., is reportedly underwater after the superstorm struck the East Coast, destroying communities and leaving residents in the tri-state area and beyond without power or homes.

[Huffington Post]

Hurricane Sandy Delivers ‘Another Catastrophe’ To Verizon’s Home, Complicating Network Repairs

The water came rushing through the lobby, crashing against doors, shattering windows and scattering sandbags meant to stop it. Then, it cascaded down the stairs and flooded the underground cable vault, soaking tangled wires that deliver phone and Internet service to customers across the region.

[Huffington Post]

Long Way From Normalcy

Thousands of owners and tenants of downtown buildings celebrated the return of power over the weekend, but Alessandro Giannini, a manager of an Italian restaurant near South Street Seaport, wasn’t among them. His 42-seat Il Brigante may not be able to reopen for weeks. It’s part of the Historic Front Street retail and residential redevelopment project, which was ravaged by flood waters.

[WSJ]

In Marine Park, Lending a Hand Is Routine

Even after a huge swath of its neighborhood lost power because of Sandy, Marine Park Hardware on Avenue S in South Brooklyn was open for business. Shoppers stayed outside the store to avoid hurting themselves in the darkened aisles, but they could request items they wanted at the front door. Some lingered to chat with neighbors.

[WSJ]

Another storm headed toward weather-beaten NY, NJ

Just what New York and New Jersey need after the devastation of Superstorm Sandy: more high winds. The National Weather Service predicted Sunday that a Nor’easter that could include gusts of up to 55 mph is likely to reach the area by Wednesday and could compound the havoc brought by last week’s violent weather.

[Google News]

Displaced Workers Find Impromptu Co-Working Spaces

With many office buildings in Manhattan still without power, mobile workers are finding ways to coexist—peacefully, for the most part—wherever they can find a power outlet and an Internet connection. The savviest nomads, weary from the battle for space at cafes, are now making temporary homes in other offices—some of which have opened to other workers for free.

[Bloomberg]

Storm Invigorates Proponents of NYC Sea Barrier

The vast destruction wreaked by the storm surge in New York could have been prevented with a sea barrier of the type that protects major cities in Europe, some scientists and engineers say. The multibillion-dollar price tag of such a project has been a hindrance, but may appear more palatable after the damage from Superstorm Sandy has been tallied.

[Construction Equipment]

In Sight of Manhattan Skyline, Living Forlorn and in the Dark

Watching the Manhattan skyline shimmer over Jamaica Bay had always been one of the charms of life in the Rockaways. But now, when the Empire State Building winks on each night, those lights feel almost like a punch in the gut.

[NYT]

Manhattan’s power is back, but hubbub is missing from restaurant scene after Superstorm Sandy

Manhattan may have most of its power back, but its buzzing restaurant scene is still weak from Superstorm Sandy. Eateries throughout Meatpacking, Soho and the East Village still weren’t open for business Sunday, drying out their watery basements, where flooding ruined fridges and other costly equipment.

[NY Daily News]

Flooding From Sandy Has Closed The Statue Of Liberty Indefinitely

Poor Lady Liberty. After a year of extensive renovations, the National Park Service finally opened the Statue of Liberty to the public last week; now, flooding from Sandy has forced her to close down indefinitely. Luckily, Sandy spared the Lady herself—a surface inspection yielded no damage to the statue or her torch. But the storm surge flooded both the Statue of Liberty site and nearby Ellis Island with water from the New York Harbor, and the docks and grounds are in need of repair.

[Gothamist]

On Brooklyn’s waterfront, Red Hook learns to cope without power

At the 99 Cent Dreams store in Red Hook, a working-class neighborhood on New York Harbor, Ramon Rodriguez spent part of his Sunday hunting for fresh supplies as the disruptions from superstorm Sandy continued for a second week. The 70-year-old is one of hundreds in the neighborhood’s public housing apartments without heat and power after Sandy’s floodwaters swamped the area.

[Reuters]

Can Landlords Charge Rent While Buildings Are Uninhabitable?

With many buildings still uninhabitable, one question on a lot of peoples’ minds is whether or not landlords will be able to demand rent payments for apartments that can’t be lived in.

[Curbed]

60 NYC Voting Sites Have Changed So Check Where To Cast Ballots

Hey, even though many parts of New York City are more focused on recovering from Hurricane Sandy, Tuesday is still Election Day. Which means that people without cars or connections to transportation will have to figure out a way to polling sites. Oh, and some polling sites have changed because some schools are being used as shelters—which means 143,000 voters will be displaced. So please look at this list of polling site changes!

[Gothamist]

Brooklyn restaurants and bars boom post-Sandy

It was one of The Gate’s busiest Tuesdays since the Brooklyn bar opened 15 years ago. It happened the day after New York was slammed by Superstorm Sandy, the devastating storm that flooded the subway system and knocked off power for millions.

[CNN Money]

Many in Alphabet City and Stuyvesant Town Still in Dark, Cold

While the lights came on for most of the East Village Friday, and bars and restaurants wasted no time breaking out the bubbly, many in the neighborhood are complaining they’ve been left in the dark – and the cold.

[NYT]

A Goal of $1,000 a Square Foot (or Less)

WITH his rent in the mid-$3,000s and no end to increases in sight, Vishaal B. Bhuyan figured that owning made more sense than renting. Mr. Bhuyan, 29, was happy in his rental at 95 Wall Street in the financial district. He knew that his neighborhood offered some deals on condominiums, which is what he was after.

[NYT]

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